ArtLink Wraps Up the School Year in Style!

A few days ago the NAA's ArtLink* program wrapped up the school year with a very special day.  Artist members Susan Spellman (http://www.suespellmanstudio.com/) and Susan Stranc (http://www.appleciderpress.net/) led a Plein Air workshop for Newburyport High School art students.  Students and art faculty met at the NAA galleries for a slide show presentation by Susan & Susan (their informative slide show is provided below).  Following the presentation and discussion in the Hartson Gallery, the workshop headed outdoors to Maudslay State Park for a full day's Plein Air Workshop. 

 

*ArtLink is the umbrella name for all the NAA's collaborative programming with local school districts (gallery visits and talks, classes and workshops in the schools, scholarships and awards, Young & Budding Artists Show, partnering with NHS National Art Honor Society, and more) - programming is funded by the NAA, local institutional and individual donors.


BLUE

Michael Kirby Smith for the New York Times

Michael Kirby Smith for the New York Times

Blue is the color of light between violet and green on the visible spectrum.

Blue_image 2.jpg

 Hues of blue include indigo and ultramarine, closer to violet; pure blue, without any mixture of other colors; Cyan, which is midway on the spectrum between blue and green, and the other blue-greens turquoise, teal, and aquamarine.

Blues also vary in shade or tint; darker shades of blue contain black or grey, while lighter tints contain white. Darker shades of blue include ultramarine, cobalt blue, navy blue, and Prussian blue; while lighter tints include sky blue, azure, and Egyptian blue[1]

 There are sixty-three colors of blue listed in Wikipedia!

Some of us have a favorite blue.  Maybe it’s a memory that responds to the color. An ocean voyage, the sky at a certain time of day, a pond of childhood, or the color of someone’s eyes.  We might be the collectors of blue and white Delft or maybe it’s the blue of that beat up denim shirt that got better with age.

“The artist Spencer Finch often thought about the color of the sky on September 11, the kind of crystalline blue that pilots and meteorologists call “severe clear.”[2]

The artist Spencer Finch, 51, at his studio in Brooklyn Credit, Michael Kirby Smith for the New York Times

The artist Spencer Finch, 51, at his studio in Brooklyn

Credit, Michael Kirby Smith for the New York Times

“Trying To Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning” is a monumental but at the same time delicate work made up of 2,983 individual squares of Fabriano Italian paper — one square for every person killed in the Sept. 11 attacks and in the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center — each hand-painted a different shade of blue by Mr. Finch. He said he likes to think of them as drawings, and he has arranged them in a wide grid that towers almost 40 feet high, covering most of a central wall at bedrock level, behind which lies the repository, closed to the public, for unidentified remains of those who died at the World Trade Center.”[3]

"Trying to Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning," the work by Spencer Finch, at the National September 11 Memorial Museum, which opens to the public on Wednesday Credit, Damon Winter/ The New York Times

"Trying to Remember the Color of the Sky on That September Morning," the work by Spencer Finch, at the National September 11 Memorial Museum, which opens to the public on Wednesday

Credit, Damon Winter/ The New York Times

 Tell us about your BLUE.

 

[1] Wikipedia: Blue

[2] RANDY KENNEDY  MAY 14, 2014, The Searing Blues of the 9/11 Sky 

[3] http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/15/arts/design/spencer-finch-turned-to-the-heavens-to-honor-the-dead.html?ref=design